License force us to share

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By Hugop 5 Mar 2016 16:12

Member · 19 comments

Hi everyone,

I would like to know if we could have the permission to make our own Tuxemon game (different Tuxemonsters, levels, gfx, sfx, anis, ...) without sharing it and, if possible, for commercial use.

I don't feel comfortable to finish a game with great levels, sprites and sfx while the other ones on my back steal my resources and call it their own.

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By Sanglorian 5 Mar 2016 23:43

Champion · 420 comments

Hi Hugop,

I don't quite understand your question.

(1) You can make your own Tuxemon game for commercial use under the current licences. However, they will allow others to share your game (either commercially or non-commercially, or both).

(2) There is no way for other people to steal your resources and take credit for them. The licences we're using all require proper credit to be given to the creators.

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By Hugop 6 Mar 2016 10:59

Member · 19 comments

By share, I mean the source code.

We have, for some reason, 2licenses.

CC 3.0: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
GPL 2.0: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html

As CC 3.0 says:
ShareAlike — If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you must distribute your contributions under the same license as the original.

That means we have to share it as GPL 2.0, which means publish the source code. That's not the only problem, because GPL itself want us to have the source code open to public if we publish it.

http://programmers.stackexchange.com/qu … pplication

tL;dr: Got to love the GPL: Force everything that touches it to be open source

And for (2), that is how it is supposed to work, but who respected the copyright license of the Pokemon game itself? ROMs are published everywhere with modifications, there are even Pokemon Online games with all the Pokemon images, all this from a commercial game.

Back to what I want, according to GPL, I am allowed to not share it if both parties accept that.

Last edited by Hugop (6 Mar 2016 11:16)

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By Sanglorian 6 Mar 2016 13:09

Champion · 420 comments

Hi Hugop,

I'm still unclear on what your concerns are.

So in this scenario, you have created your own assets.

You've also used, but changed, the Tuxemon source code.

You don't want others to have access to your changes to the source code because if they have access they might violate the GPL and use the source code as their own without giving you credit.

Is that a correct summary of your feelings on the issue?

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By Hugop 6 Mar 2016 16:03

Member · 19 comments

I am unclear what makes you unclear. Everyone that makes anything with Tuxemon needs to share the source code, graphic, levels, animations, sounds etc. to the public and the public is allowed to use it for their own projects.

I am not sure if you have read this but I am going to paste the link once again because it explains everything good enough: http://programmers.stackexchange.com/qu … pplication.

Let's say you work really hard on your own game using Tuxemon. You are forced to share everyone the source code and everything else, anyone is allowed to do small changes and place ads everywhere to earn money. Do you still think it is worth making your own Tuxemon game?

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By tamashihoshi 6 Mar 2016 17:27

Champion · 242 comments
Hugop wrote

Everyone that makes anything with Tuxemon needs to share the source code, graphic, levels, animations, sounds etc. to the public and the public is allowed to use it for their own projects.

If I understand this right, you only have to share the source code...so graphics, levels, animations, sounds are still yours. The graphics used in tuxemon have CC stuff I dont get, while the code has something else. So thats seperate...

Hugop wrote

Let's say you work really hard on your own game using Tuxemon. You are forced to share everyone the source code and everything else, anyone is allowed to do small changes and place ads everywhere to earn money. Do you still think it is worth making your own Tuxemon game?

Sanglorian wrote

You don't want others to have access to your changes to the source code because if they have access they might violate the GPL and use the source code as their own without giving you credit.

IMO You are both talking about the same problem...
Hugop, people can also violate the "orignal" tuxemon. Do you now think its not worth making tuxemon?

I'm not exactly sure what you're going... Why do you want to make your own tuxemon? You can work with us on "this" tuxemon.. it wont bring you money but I dont see how it makes sense to start something new. Also if you just take our code and make money with it, you could as well put it on your web page with ads as you mentioned ._. i dont see a big difference tbh

We are working on downloadable campaigns.. with this you could make your "own" tuxemon, having your own creatures, your own items, your own story, your own whatever... its all possible. Instead, you want to take the code, do exactly what our campaings gonna do, but charge money for it? Sounds a little off to me yikes

AAAAnyways... if you're only after the code, write a mail to the owner. Its not like many people worked on it. ShadowApex and bitcraft did alot, so you should ask them directly if you to use the code without GPL


my pretty inactive DeviantArt Account is here: http://tamashihoshi.deviantart.com/
I'm also pretty inactive on OpenGameArt: http://opengameart.org/users/tamashihoshi

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By ShadowApex 6 Mar 2016 18:27

Lead Developer · 368 comments
Hugop wrote

I don't feel comfortable to finish a game with great levels, sprites and sfx while the other ones on my back steal my resources and call it their own.

As Sanglorian said, using any code or assets without attributing the original creator violates the licensing terms we use for the Tuxemon project. You can see attributions for all the assets used in Tuxemon here and we strongly enforce ensuring that artists and programmers receive proper credit for their work.

Hugop wrote

We have, for some reason, 2licenses.

CC 3.0: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/
GPL 2.0: http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-2.0.html

All art assets, maps, music, etc. are licensed under Creative Commons (or compatible license) and all code is licensed under GPL 3.0. Artwork and assets are usually better licensed under Creative Commons than GPL.

Hugop wrote

Let's say you work really hard on your own game using Tuxemon. You are forced to share everyone the source code and everything else, anyone is allowed to do small changes and place ads everywhere to earn money. Do you still think it is worth making your own Tuxemon game?

The whole reason the Tuxemon project was started was to create a free and open source project for anyone to use for any purpose. The free licenses we use (CC & GPL) helps ensure that if anyone wants to change or modify the project, they need to release those changes to help keep the project free and open for others to build on and improve.

To address your specific example, sure someone could fork the project, make changes, and put ads everywhere in-game, but it wouldn't be very popular. Because the GPL requires releasing any modifications made to the project, anyone could simply take those changes, remove all the ads, and host an ad-free version elsewhere. It's also worth noting that the main Tuxemon project will never include any ads in-game. If a pull request was opened to Tuxemon to include ads it would not be accepted.

Hugop wrote

I would like to know if we could have the permission to make our own Tuxemon game (different Tuxemonsters, levels, gfx, sfx, anis, ...) without sharing it and, if possible, for commercial use.

The short answer here is no, because it goes against the entire premise of the project. Tuxemon itself wouldn't exist if it weren't for the others that provided the code and artwork for others to freely use and modify. Python, Pygame, PyTMX, libShake, and SDL are all technologies that the project uses and all of these were released by their creators as free and open source software.

The reason Tuxemon is open source is a philosophical one. If you want to know why people work hard on open source software/artwork and give it away for free, I would suggest checking out some of these articles:

If you want to use Tuxemon to create your own commercial game, you could technically do so, but with some restrictions:

  • Any code additions or modifications must be released to the public under the GPL license.
  • If you decide to use your own non-free artwork and assets, you cannot combine or use them with any Creative Commons assets.
  • You would not be able to use the Tuxemon name for your project.


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By Hugop 6 Mar 2016 20:22

Member · 19 comments
ShadowApex wrote

As Sanglorian said, using any code or assets without attributing the original creator violates the licensing terms we use for the Tuxemon project. You can see attributions for all the assets used in Tuxemon here and we strongly enforce ensuring that artists and programmers receive proper credit for their work.

I know that, but not everyone respects that, sadly.

ShadowApex wrote
Hugop wrote

I would like to know if we could have the permission to make our own Tuxemon game (different Tuxemonsters, levels, gfx, sfx, anis, ...) without sharing it and, if possible, for commercial use.

The short answer here is no, because it goes against the entire premise of the project. Tuxemon itself wouldn't exist if it weren't for the others that provided the code and artwork for others to freely use and modify. Python, Pygame, PyTMX, libShake, and SDL are all technologies that the project uses and all of these were released by their creators as free and open source software.

The reason Tuxemon is open source is a philosophical one. If you want to know why people work hard on open source software/artwork and give it away for free, I would suggest checking out some of these articles:

Don't get me wrong, I am not against open source projects, but the license GPL.

ShadowApex wrote

If you want to use Tuxemon to create your own commercial game, you could technically do so, but with some restrictions:

  • Any code additions or modifications must be released to the public under the GPL license.
  • If you decide to use your own non-free artwork and assets, you cannot combine or use them with any Creative Commons assets.
  • You would not be able to use the Tuxemon name for your project.

As the first post mentions, what if I don't make core changes but graphic, levels, variables, sounds, translations etc, do I still have to share the source code?

ShadowApex wrote

If you decide to use your own non-free artwork and assets, you cannot combine or use them with any Creative Commons assets.

I am planning to do my own artword, but doesn't CC allow to share artwork and assets for commercial use?

You are free to:

    Share — copy and redistribute the material in any medium or format
    Adapt — remix, transform, and build upon the material
    for any purpose, even commercially.

    The licensor cannot revoke these freedoms as long as you follow the license terms.

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By ShadowApex 6 Mar 2016 21:07

Lead Developer · 368 comments
Hugop wrote

I know that, but not everyone respects that, sadly.

This is true for both free and non-free software unfortunately.

Hugop wrote

As the first post mentions, what if I don't make core changes but graphic, levels, variables, sounds, translations etc, do I still have to share the source code?

Yes, you will need to share the source code, even if it is unmodified:
http://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-faq.en. … JustBinary

Hugop wrote

I am planning to do my own artword, but doesn't CC allow to share artwork and assets for commercial use?

Yes, you can use CC-BY-SA (although not CC-BY-NC-SA) for commercial use, but you can't combine non-free artwork with free artwork. By using the assets together, you are creating a new piece of remixed art, which would violate the Creative Commons license. So yes, you could use your own artwork and the existing CC-BY-SA artwork for your own commercial game, but you would need to also release your artwork under Creative Commons.

As a side note, if you're worried about others profiting off of your artwork and assets, why are you looking to do the same off of the others' open source works? I understand that you want to be compensated for your work, but you can still do that with licensing your work under Creative Commons.


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By Hugop 6 Mar 2016 21:43

Member · 19 comments

It is alright for me to share my art and sounds for their own projects under CC-BY-NC-SA, I just dislike the part where I have to share the entire project unencrypted on GitHub or similar.

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By Sanglorian 6 Mar 2016 22:30

Champion · 420 comments

Hey Hugop, I think what ShadowApex is saying is that if you don't use any of our sprites, sounds, images or other assets, then yes you can put your art and sounds under CC BY-NC-SA, or under no licence at all, but if you use some of our assets, then your assets have to be CC BY-SA too.

That's by default legally. I understand that you are asking for permission outside of the licensing system, but for the assets that would be even more difficult than the code, since there have been several asset contributors, and each of them would have to give their permission. (Something that I, for example, would be reluctant to do).

EDIT: And, in fact, some contributors aren't involved in the project at all, since we've just made use of the CC BY-SA licence that they've put on their works.

Last edited by Sanglorian (6 Mar 2016 22:32)

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By Hugop 7 Mar 2016 00:11

Member · 19 comments

@Sanglorian the problem is GPL forcing us to publish our own Tuxemon projects to GitHub or similar.

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By benneti 7 Mar 2016 08:05

Member · 38 comments

no, i don`t think so, the gpl states that if you share the binary you have to share the source, too. The way is never declared, you could require interested persons to send you a pgp encrypted mail and then send them the source in whatever way you may like, as long as you give them the possibility to get the source and the rights stated by the gpl (well this includes that they can publish the modified source on github, but that is another story). An example for this would be Red Hat Enterprise Linux (I think you only get the source if you purchase the product, but you get the rights to share it again and so there is centos wich is based of this sources and accessible for free (as in free beer and free as in freedom).

In my opinion the gpl is a very nice licence and it helped the free software movement a lot and i think it does most of the things right!

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By Hugop 7 Mar 2016 10:39

Member · 19 comments

I guess I will do the mail trick and if anyone asks, I link them to Tuxemon because it is more updated.

But what about my ressources? I don't want some of them to be GPL(logo and licensed songs f.ex) but if they aren't GPL, the license wouldn't make sense because they want us to make "object a and object b become object a+b and everything in it GPL". They made an exception for fonts on the FAQ but I am not sure what else can be another exception.

I sent them an e-mail about the ressources yesterday and I am waiting for their reply.

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By Sanglorian 8 Mar 2016 07:31

Champion · 420 comments

Hi Hugop,

I think this Stackexchange discussion may explore the topics that you are concerned with: https://programmers.stackexchange.com/q … he-license

However, even if the assets are not limited by the GPL, they'll still be covered by the CC BY-SA licence - unless you do all new assets yourself.

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By bitcraft 8 Mar 2016 22:14

Champion · 127 comments

This is almost an universal law, that ideas will be shared, copied, modified, and distributed.  Even in nature you see species mimicking others for survival.  No amount of legal force will prevent somebody from stealing your work and claiming it as their own.  The GPL is simply a way to discourage selfish copying, and encourage helpful sharing.  Even closed source software, games, etc are copied, hacked, shared, redistributed.  It sounds to me like you want to make a closed fork of Tuxemon, which violates the license it is released under.

I don't mean to be crass, but nobody is forcing you to contribute.  The goals of Tuxemon are to be free and open source.  "Libre" comes to mind.  If you don't like the terms, you are free to find another project to work with, or develop your own.

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By Hugop 9 Mar 2016 02:16

Member · 19 comments

Don't get me wrong, I just don't want to share my sprites and sounds to give my project an unique feeling. I can and will use some of my free time on the official Tuxemon project.

About the license, law>license, I can trademark my ressources as ShadowApex mentioned and if I publish my project with the ressources, they are forced to remove it.

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By Kelvin 12 Oct 2016 13:56

Member · 44 comments

CC is pretty simple, really. You can do what you want, provided you give credit for what you use. It's only stealing if they don't give you credit for what you contribute to a project. If you want to make your own Tuxemon game, I don't see what's so bad about sharing the source code without the assets. Just put in a bunch of placeholders and have people fill it in themselves.

The fact is that if you make a good enough game for people to take your assets, there's a very good chance they'll end up on The Spriters Resource anyway. Given that even copyright-paranoid companies like Nintendo haven't taken TSR down yet, I don't think you'd have to worry about that, anyway. People are gonna rip your work and redistribute it, anyway, so you might actually help yourself by submitting those assets to such sites with a tag pointing people to your game's site. I actually think ripping and sharing the assets helps gain a following for games. I, myself, have found several games through TSR that I got interested in just by looking at the sprites.

If you're worried about people using your assets in another game, well, that's gonna happen, anyway. Now, if someone is selling a game made with your assets, and you didn't make them CC or PL, then they owe you for damages, and you can take action against them, but if it's just a free game that doesn't use any assets directly connecting to your trademark, there's really no threat there. Now, some developers may use that as a case for allowing them to use those assets in a commercial game, which is why, if you're going to allow such leniency, you must outline that ahead of time before there's any trouble.

Anyway, that's just my two cents. Seems I stretched it into a dollar there, heheh.


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By MirceaKitsune 12 May 2017 22:55

Member · 33 comments

Just saw this thread and thought to clarify: The only thing you are forced to share is the source code, as it's GPL and that's a basic requirement. Share means that if you distribute the Tuxemon engine (eg: as part of a standalone version of your game), you need to include the source code as well.

A fun mention: This doesn't actually matter for Python, since it's a scripting language and the source code is the same as the compiled binary. Therefore whenever you distribute the engine in a working format, you automatically distribute the source code too. That only differs for languages such as C++ or Java, where the binaries are compiled manually and are an independent product from the source.

That being said, the rest depends on one thing: Do you wish to distribute your game as a mod that works on top of Tuxemon, or as a standalone version? If it's the first, and you're distributing only the game which people download and unpack into Tuxemon, everything there includes your assets and you can license them as you please. If it's the second, and you're distributing a modified version of Tuxemon with your game embedded, the code must of course remain GPL whereas the builtin assets remain under their own licenses (of course you can always replace them).

Only one mention: This refers to assets such as graphics and sounds and definitions. If your game includes custom scripts which modify python functions, they must also be licensed under the GPL. That's the difference between GPL and LGPL: The first says "the source code and any code embedded with it must be GPL", whereas the later says "the source code must be GPL but other code you embed with it can be whatever you want".